The End of Boys (Cover/Reviews/Advanced Praise)

Cover of the book:

Available for order though Amazon, Powell’s, Barnes & Noble.

Reviews:

“In his first book, Hoffmeister calls every sense into play, providing rich imagery, grounded reflection, and the tension inherent in a coming-of-age tale…brilliant memoir…” – LA Review

“The End of Boys takes no prisoners with its gritty, entrancing realism…a chilling and captivating read…a voice that is refreshingly new.” – Eugene Weekly

“Bluntly compelling . . . Hoffmeister foregrounds his own experiences over introspection or critique, lending the work a rare weight and immediacy.” —The Portland Mercury

“About a difficult childhood…tough stuff, honest and real.” – The Oregonian

“…one powerful memoir…delineates a life going off the track…” – Rock and Ice Magazine

Advanced Author Blurbs:

“Compelling from the first page, The End of Boys is a stark and gritty memoir of a tormented adolescence, where the demons of obsessive compulsive disorder, drugs, and violence are banished by the healing light of literature and faith. Both haunting and uplifting,The End of Boys is a touching and powerful account of a turbulent transition from youth to manhood.” —Jamie Maslin, author of Socialist Dreams and Beauty Queens and Iranian Rappers and Persian Porn

“In vivid prose, Peter Brown Hoffmeister depicts the relentlessly violent days and nights of a male adolescence. He writes about authorities’ failures to protect their young charges, and about the consequences of those failures. At the book’s best moments, Hoffmeister looks directly at his rage and tells us what he sees.” – Sarah Manguso, author of The Two Kinds of Decay

The End of Boys is remarkable story, a testament to the spirit of young boys everywhere, to mothers, fathers, brothers and sisters, to friends and the parents of friends, to teachers, cops, and counselors, to art and literature and the human desire to find a place in the world, to build a meaningful life out of shards and fragments. Peter Hoffmeister has written a terrific book about the human struggle to regain ourselves after great disillusion and desperation. This is a fine book, made of fine true words, each one tough, carefully chosen, and hard-won. I read The End of Boys in one sitting.” —Dorianne Laux, author of What We Carry, finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award

The End of Boys, the story of a boy who can’t find his family even in the midst of them, is big-hearted and heartbreaking. Hoffmeister’s journey through the loss, confusion, and fear of adolescence is unflinching and free of even a single note of sentimentality or self-pity. Read this book. It will punch you in the face, in the best way possible.” —Miriam Gershow, author of The Local News

“Through all the rage, the drugs, the violence and despair, what ultimately lies at the heart of Peter Hoffmeister’s vivid true-life tale The End of Boys is love and forgiveness, and a warmth that is as tangible as it is genuine.  This is a harrowing journey for sure, but one beautifully rendered and well worth taking.  It is the journey home.” – Nathan Singer, author of A Prayer for Dawn.

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8 thoughts on “The End of Boys (Cover/Reviews/Advanced Praise)

  1. ” The End of Boys is a remarkable story of a remarkable young man who made a remarkable choice: to be a husband, a father, a brother, a son, a teacher, and the writer he wasn’t sure he could be. Peter Hoffimeister has written a terrific book about the human struggle to regain ourselves after great disillusion and desperation. It’s a book about family, loyalty, humility and the “harsh journey” toward wholeness. I read The End of Boys in one sitting.

    The End of Boys is a testament to the spirit of young boys everywhere, to mothers, fathers, brothers and sisters, to friends and the parents of friends, to teachers, cops and counselors, to art and literature and the human desire to find a place in the world, to build a meaningful life out of shards and fragments. This is a fine book Peter Hoffmeister, made of fine true words, each one tough, carefully chosen, and hard-won.

    –Dorianne Laux

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  2. Even though I doubt you will read this…I have to say I am disappointed that I found it challenging to figure out from your website how to respond as a reader to your book. I have lived in Eugene Oregon most of my life. I recently read your book (July 2012) I know of your father quite well. My
    sister is a nurse; 20 years Sacred Heart/Riverbend married to Sacred Heart ER doctor. I am well aware of the competitive nature exsisting in the nature of doctors. The first question I have is why did you mention Sarah Palin in your acknowledgments? My next comment has to do with something you said regarding you being responsible for a choice you made at 16. To be honest I can’t remember if that was from the book or an interview I heard.
    You stated something to the effect that this choice was your responsibility,
    and fortunately it turned out for the best. I have to strongly disagree with
    such a prespective. I strongly believe that it is the parents who are responsible for the guidance and the choices that their children will be making. Yes the children will be making not so good choices, but that
    is not the fault of the children, because they are still continuing to learn and
    are imature and are guided and consoled by the parents. Your parents took the way of sending you off to others to be ‘guided and parented.’ They did not know how to parent themselves. So for you to feel that you are completely responsible for a choice you made as a teenager is misguided,
    and untrue. As Dr Phil says (who is a Republican) the parents are 100%responsible for the direction the childs life takes. Your parents obviously checked out on so many levels. For you to feel like a choice you made at
    16 is your sole responsibilty is letting your parents off the hook. If we are talking about forgiveness then that is different. I feel from reading your book that your parents really let you down and your life could have very easily turned out so tragically with you or someone else’s life comepletely damaged or snuffed out. How lucky for you and your parents that it did not end that way.
    You were the product of a dysfunctional family that was unable to express love in a healthy way. I am glad to see that time has helped your family to grow in that way.

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    • Liz –
      Thank you for reading carefully and taking the time to think about the book. I appreciate that.
      On the “Sarah Palin” thanks in the acknowledgements, that section was full of nicknames and inside jokes (since I wanted to acknowledge people who matter to me in a personal way). I don’t know the real Sarah Palin, and I wasn’t trying to establish myself as a republican there. But…
      I do understand what you’re saying with the Dr. Phil point. Even an older child is still a child, and parents do affect their children into adulthood. I don’t know when we as people should become responsible for all of our actions, and perhaps that is a nebulous concept. I know that it’s not math, and there’s no specific age.
      I do promote the idea that we have to take responsibility for our choices even if those choices are heavily influenced by our parents’ actions and choices. If I hit someone, I have to take responsibility for hitting him whether I’m 8, 18, or 80.
      Finally, you are absolutely correct. I feel blessed to live the life I currently do. So many things could have been worse, or had more significant outcomes. My life is not a movie because a movie would not have ended in the strange way that my book did.
      Thank you for writing such a thoughtful note.
      – Peter Brown Hoffmeister

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  3. Peter,

    Thank you for the signed copy of graphic the valley – I look forward to reading it and plan to order The End of Boys from Wally soon as well. I hope we can arrange an opportunity for you to visit my school – from what I can tell, my students will appreciate The End of Boys and the opportunity to talk about the book with you.

    Thanks,
    Tim Rigsby
    Principal
    Juniper Hills School
    Idaho Department of Juvenile Corrections – Nampa

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    • Tim –
      Thank you for reading Graphic, and for your interest in The End of Boys too. I’d love to visit your school and talk with the kids there some time. It can be a long road back, but it’s good to have hope and models for success. I was really grateful for mine. Keep in touch and let’s figure something out for next year.
      – Peter

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  4. I’m changed after reading The End of Boys. Scared to admit I could see some of myself in your parents, and some of my son in you. Determined to improve. Thank you for your honest story.

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    • I meant to include that my son loves to be outside, and is disappointed we don’t live closer to woods. Your theory of getting him outside more is my new goal.

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      • Lisa – It’s hard to be a parent a lot of the time. We all make our share of mistakes. But you don’t sound afraid to admit them. You’re brave.
        Thank you so much for reading. -PBH

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